Frequently Asked Questions

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FAQ

Pasture-raised means that animals get a significant portion of their nutrition from grass only. They get it from managed pastures. A pasture-raised beef should not be labeled 100% grass fed. I have changed my mind about raising 100% grass fed beef. Here is my reason: During very cold temperatures in winter or blazing hot summers, I believe cattle need to have supplements in their diet. I will not let one of my animals go hungry because of the climate. If I need to feed some type of grain (range cubes) to keep them healthy, I will do so. This does not mean I will feed grain all the time. I will only do it long enough until conditions enable them to go back to grazing grass. I assure you that my beef will not be grain finished. I will only finish them on grass and hay.
Grass-fed beef refers to beef animals that primarily feed on native and other natural grasses. Most store-bought beef is fed a significant amount of corn, grain, supplements and other additives to artificially ‘fatten’ up the beef. The result is that you are paying for fat and a less-healthy cut of meat.
Pasture-raised means that animals get a significant portion of their nutrition from grass only. They get it from managed pastures. A pasture-raised beef can not be labeled 100% grass fed. I have changed my mind about raising 100% grass fed beef. Here is my reason: During very cold temperatures in winter or blazing hot summers, I believe cattle need to have supplements in their diet. I will not let one of my animals go hungry because of the climate. If I need to feed some type of grain (range cubes) to keep them healthy, I will do so. This does not mean I will feed grain all the time. I will only do it long enough until conditions enable them to go back to grazing grass. I assure you that my beef will not be grain finished. I will only finish them on grass or hay.
When you purchase grass fed beef you need to be aware of these terms and know the difference. The Live Weight is the weight of the animal when it is brought to the butcher. The Hanging Weight is the weight after slaughter. The Hanging, or Dressed weight will determine how much you will pay for the processed beef. The Beef Yield Percentage from live to dressed is approximately 53% to 62% of the live weight. Example: If the animal weighed 800 pounds the hanging weight would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 424 to 496 pounds. So now, the table weight is the amount of beef after processing. This accounts for another loss in weight when excess fat and bone are removed. This results in another 50% to 65% reduction. Then your table weight (processed) beef would be between 212 and 322 pounds of healthy grass fed beef.
For a number of reasons, grass fed beef is a healthier option versus store-bought beef. Grass fed beef has about 30-40% less total fat, more antioxidant vitamins (vitamins A, D, E and K), less cholesterol and is rich in Omega-3s. Our beef is 100% all natural and raised with no hormones, GMOs or artificial additives.
Our beef is processed exclusively by the Butcher Block in Cross Plains, Texas. This is a family owned, Texas inspected certified processing plant approximately 4 miles from our ranch. The cattle are humanely and efficiently processed, dry aged for 14 days then butchered and vacuum wrapped.
Sure, sharing the cost of the beef is a good idea and will save you money as well. I would recommend purchasing a whole or half beef. You and your partner would need to divide the beef yourself after processing.
Yes. Because grass-fed beef is a leaner meat, you will have the best results by reducing the cooking temperature to medium setting, and reducing the cooking time by about 30% when grilling or pan frying. Grass fed beef is best enjoyed at a medium temperature, medium rare or rare. Grass-fed beef is like fine seafood; do not overcook! We recommend using a meat thermometer for best results cooking grass-fed beef.
Unfortunately no we do not have a refund policy. Processed beef is a consumable product. Once it leaves our control, there is no way we could guarantee the safety of the product if returned. Every effort has been made to insure that you have the best grass-fed beef possible. If you do not enjoy the beef, please let us know. Knowing the problem will help us improve our product.

Cooking Tips

The main reason for tough grass-fed beef is overcooking. The beef usually will require 30% less cooking time and will continue to cook when removed from heat. Since grass-fed beef is extremely low in fat, coat with olive oil, or a favorite light oil for flavor enhancement and easy browning. The oil will also prevent drying and sticking. Recommended temperature for grass fed meat:

RARE – 125 130 F

MEDIUM RARE– 130 – 140 F

MEDIUM – 140 -150 F

MEDIUM WELL – 150 – 155 F

WELL – 160 – 212 F                                                                                                  This is for grain fed beef. For grass fed subtract 10 to 20 F

Baste the meat to add moisture throughout the grilling process. Don’t forget grass-fed beef requires 30% less cooking time so don’t leave your steaks unattended.

When roasting, sear the beef to lock in the juices and then place it in a pre-heated oven.

Stove top cooking is great for any type of steak… including grass-fed steak! You can use butter in the final minutes when the heat is low.

If roasting, reduce the temperature of your grain-fed beef recipes by 50 degrees. This usually means around 275 degrees for roasting, or at the lowest heat setting in a crock pot. The cooking time will still be the same or slightly shorter, even at the lower temperature. Again, watch your meat thermometer and don’t overcook your meat.

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